DISRAELI DOCUMENTS

Whippet

UK Patent 1899 18,240 - Whippet New Protean main image UK Patent 1899 18,240 - Whippet New Protean main image UK Patent 1899 18,240 - Whippet New Protean main image


see also The Science Museum - The Whippet 1885

see also The Science Museum - The Whippet 1885

The Science Museum - The Whippet thumbnail


see also UK Patent 1894 # 17,908

see also UK Patent 1894 # 17,908

UK Patent 1894 17,908 - Whippet Protean thumbnail


see also The London Gazette 10/1896 - Whippet

see also The London Gazette 10/1896 - Whippet

The London Gazette 13-10-96 thumbnail


see also TCF Rev Mens 08/1899 - En Montagne

see also TCF Rev Mens 08/1899 - En Montagne

T.C.F. Revue Mensuelle August 1899 - En Montagne scan 1 thumbnail


see also UK Patent 1899 # 18,240

see also UK Patent 1899 # 18,240

UK Patent 1899 18,240 - Whippet New Protean thumbnail



see also The Engineer 1899 - The Cycle Shows

see also The Engineer 1899 - The Cycle Shows

The Engineer 1899 - The Cycle Shows scan 1 thumbnail


see also Unknown UK magazine 1899 - Whippet ad

see also Unknown UK magazine 1899 - Whippet ad

Unknown UK magazine 1899 - Whippet advert thumbnail



see also The Engineer 1902 - The Cycle Shows

see also The Engineer 1902 - The Cycle Shows

The Engineer 1902 - The Cycle Shows thumbnail


see also The London Gazette 02/1904 - Whippet

see also The London Gazette 02/1904 - Whippet

The London Gazette 23-02-04 scan 1 thumbnail


see also The London Gazette 06/1904 - Whippet

see also The London Gazette 06/1904 - Whippet

The London Gazette 17-06-04 scan 1 thumbnail


see also The London Gazette 09/1905 - Whippet

see also The London Gazette 09/1905 - Whippet

The London Gazette 15-09-05 thumbnail


see also The London Gazette 03/1906 - Whippet

see also The London Gazette 03/1906 - Whippet

The London Gazette 27-03-06 thumbnail



see also TCF Rev Mens 01/1911 - La Bicyclette au Salon

see also TCF Rev Mens 01/1911 - La Bicyclette au Salon

T.C.F. Revue Mensuelle January 1911 - La Bicyclette au Salon scan 1 thumbnail


see also TCF Rev Mens 04/1911 - Un Nouveau Concours?

see also TCF Rev Mens 04/1911 - Un Nouveau Concours?

T.C.F. Revue Mensuelle April 1911 - Un Nouveau Concours? scan 1 thumbnail



see also TCF Rev Mens 03/1913 - La Bicyclette hors du Salon

see also TCF Rev Mens 03/1913 - La Bicyclette hors du Salon

T.C.F. Revue Mensuelle March 1913 - La Bicyclette hors du Salon scan 1 thumbnail


see also TCF Rev Mens 03/1914 - Pour le Cyclotourisme

see also TCF Rev Mens 03/1914 - Pour le Cyclotourisme

T.C.F. Revue Mensuelle March 1914 - Pour le Cyclotourisme scan 1 thumbnail


see also TCF Rev Mens 04/1914 - Nos Ennemis (part VI)

see also TCF Rev Mens 04/1914 - Nos Ennemis (part VI)

T.C.F. Revue Mensuelle April 1914 - Nos Ennemis (part VI) scan 1 thumbnail


see also TCF Rev Mens 05/1914 - Boizot ad

see also TCF Rev Mens 05/1914 - Boizot ad

T.C.F. Revue Mensuelle May 1914 - Boizot advert thumbnail


see also TCF Rev Mens 06/1914 - Boizot ad

see also TCF Rev Mens 06/1914 - Boizot ad

T.C.F. Revue Mensuelle June 1914 - Boizot advert thumbnail


Charles Montague Linley was a serial inventor and entrepreneur of the late 19th and early 20th century. He was based in London. Among his many inventions, some shared with colleagues, were a sprung bicycle frame (for solid tyred wheels - pneumatic tyres were not yet available) and two transmission systems that used variable gearing.

The sprung frame was used on bicycles that Charles Linley manufactured which he branded ‘The Whippet’. These bicycles enjoyed considerable commercial success, and at one point Linley & Biggs Ltd claimed to run the largest cycle factory in London.

The first of the transmission systems was an expanding chainwheel system (see UK patent 1894 # 17,908) called ‘The Protean’. It is of interest to historians of the derailleur, partly because it included an early design for a freewheel and partly because it used a sprung pulley wheel system to maintain chain tension - possibly the first instance of this in a recognisably modern form. The Protean gear system may have been used on bicycles correctly called ‘The New Whippet’, although many seemed to still call them plain Whippets.

The second transmission system used a two speed rear freewheel and a fork derailleur (see UK patent 1899 # 18,240). This impressive device was called ‘The New Protean’. On its appearance, the New Protean received rave reviews and does appear, even in modern terms, to have been a genuinely practical and useful derailleur system.

The New Protean cannot quite claim to be the first commercial derailleur system - that honour probably goes, by a year or two, to Edmund Hodgkinson’s Gradient, but it can claim to have been more influential. Paul de Vivie, who was better known by his pen-name ‘Vélocio’ and is generally considered to be the father of the derailleur, owned a Whippet cycle probably fitted with a New Protean gear, and initially referred to all derailleurs as ‘Whippets’.

Charles Linley appears, from an item in the London Gazette in 1896 to have been involved with a number of companies including Linley & Biggs Limited, The Protean Variable Gear Syndicate Limited and the Whippet Cycle Syndicate Limited. As with many serial entrepreneurs, Charles Linley also seems to have been a consummate networker, and his adverts list the many aristocratic users of his fine products.

As an aside, one of the employees of Linley & Biggs Ltd was William Chater-Lea, who went on to manufacture many famous British cycle components of his own.

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