DISRAELI DOCUMENTS

Vivo

US Patent 5,924,946 - Vivo V1 main image US Patent 6,203,459 - Vivo V2 main image US Patent 6,416,434 - Vivo V2 main image


see also US Patent # 5,540,118 1994

see also US Patent # 5,540,118 1994

US Patent 5,540,118 - Vivo Grunge Guard thumbnail


Vivo - flyer 1995

Vivo - flyer 1995

  • Publisher: Vivo
  • Date: 1995
  • Derailleur brands: Vivo
  • Derailleurs: none
Vivo - flyer 1995 thumbnail


Vivo - flyer 1996?

Vivo - flyer 1996?

  • Publisher: Vivo
  • Date: 1996?
  • Derailleur brands: Vivo
  • Derailleurs: Vivo V1 Enduro
Vivo - flyer 1996? thumbnail


see also US Patent # 5,924,946 1997

see also US Patent # 5,924,946 1997

US Patent 5,924,946 - Vivo V1 thumbnail


Vivo - flyer 1997

Vivo - flyer 1997

  • Publisher: Vivo
  • Date: 1997
  • Derailleur brands: Vivo
  • Derailleurs: Vivo V1 Enduro
Vivo - flyer 1997 scan 1 thumbnail


Vivo Rear Derailleur Installation - 1997?

Vivo Rear Derailleur Installation - 1997?

  • Publisher: Vivo
  • Date: 1997?
  • Derailleur brands: Vivo
  • Derailleurs: Vivo V1 Enduro
Vivo Rear Derailleur Installation Installation - 1997? thumbnail


see also Mountain Bike Action - Vivo ad 1998

see also Mountain Bike Action - Vivo ad 1998

Mountain Bike Action - Vivo advert thumbnail


see also US Patent # 6,203,459 1999

see also US Patent # 6,203,459 1999

US Patent 6,203,459 - Vivo V2 thumbnail


see also US Patent # 6,416,434 2001

see also US Patent # 6,416,434 2001

US Patent 6,416,434 - Vivo V2 thumbnail


Vivo - web site 2012

Vivo - web site 2012

  • Publisher: Vivo
  • Date: 2012
  • Derailleur brands: Vivo
  • Derailleurs: Vivo V5
Vivo - web site 2012 image 1 thumbnail

Vivo is/was based in the magnificently named Plainview on Long Island, New York, USA. The dominant figure in the company appears to be one John L. Calendrille Jr., who is referred to at different times as the President of the company or the Director of Product Development. He is also registered as the inventor on Vivo’s various patents.

During the 1990s, perhaps in 1997, Vivo produced a set of rubber boots for covering derailleurs and marketed them as ‘Grunge Guards’. As you may have guessed they were an inelegant, but effective, way to keep mud out of your precious gear mechanisms.

I believe that, in 1999, Vivo released the Vivo V1 rear derailleur, that included an all enclosing rubber boot. It was essentially a CNC mountain bike derailleur fitted with a perfectly tailored, and much more minimalist, Grunge Guard. This derailleur was definitely manufactured in some quantity. Unlike the Grunge Guards, I rather liked the look of it at the time.

In 2001 Vivo appears to have launched the Vivo V2 derailleur, which was similar to the V1 but had straight cable routing. I don’t know if the V2 ever went into serious production. I have never seen one.

In 2002 Shimano appears to have bought a couple of patents from Vivo relating to their neoprene mud shield technology. This prevented Vivo from making any further derailleurs wearing rubber boots. John Calendrille apparently said that it was unfortunately, but unavoidably, true that he would earn far more money by selling his patents to Shimano than he ever could by manufacturing and selling his derailleurs.

Before the Interbike show in 2009, someone leaked that Hayes (who are famous for their hydraulic disk brake systems), would show a derailleur called the Vivo V5 Enduro. This was possibly hydraulically operated - or possibly had in-board cable routing a bit like a Suntour Cyclone Mark-II (3500). However , I believe that it never actually appeared on the Hayes stand - and I don’t know if any were ever manufactured.

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