DISRAELI DOCUMENTS

Tiso

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Tiso - instructions 2005

Tiso - instructions 2005

  • Publisher: Tiso
  • Date: 2005
  • Derailleur brands: Tiso
  • Derailleurs: Tiso Altore 366, Tiso Sereo 130, Tiso Tri 300
Tiso - instructions thumbnail


Tiso - web site 2005

Tiso - web site 2005

  • Publisher: Tiso
  • Date: 2005
  • Derailleur brands: Tiso
  • Derailleurs: Tiso Altore 366, Tiso Sereo 130, Tiso Tri 300, Tiso Venda 601
Tiso - web site 2005 image 1 thumbnail


Tiso - web site 2008

Tiso - web site 2008

  • Publisher: Tiso
  • Date: 2008
  • Derailleur brands: Tiso
  • Derailleurs: Tiso Altore 366 50mm, Tiso Altore 366 75mm, Tiso Sereo 130 50mm, Tiso Sereo 130 75mm, Tiso Tri 300, Tiso Venda 601
Tiso - web site 2008 image 1 thumbnail


Tiso - leaflet 2010

Tiso - leaflet 2010

  • Publisher: Tiso
  • Date: 2010
  • Derailleur brands: Tiso
  • Derailleurs: Tiso electronic derailleur
Tiso - leaflet thumbnail


Tiso - sticker 2010

Tiso - sticker 2010

  • Publisher: Tiso
  • Date: 2010
  • Derailleur brands: Tiso
  • Derailleurs: none
Tiso - sticker thumbnail


Tiso - web ad 11/2012

Tiso - web ad 11/2012

  • Publisher: Tiso
  • Date: November 2012
  • Derailleur brands: Tiso
  • Derailleurs: Tiso electronic derailleur
Tiso - web advert November 2012 thumbnail


Tiso - web ad 12/2012

Tiso - web ad 12/2012

  • Publisher: Tiso
  • Date: December 2012
  • Derailleur brands: Tiso
  • Derailleurs: Tiso electronic derailleur
Tiso - web advert December 2012 thumbnail


Tiso - web site 2012

Tiso - web site 2012

  • Publisher: Tiso
  • Date: 2012
  • Derailleur brands: Tiso
  • Derailleurs: Tiso Altore 366, Tiso Sereo 130, Tiso Venda 601
Tiso - web site 2012 image 1 thumbnail

In a derailleur world dominated by Shimano, in which companies as mighty as SRAM and Campagnolo struggle to make an impact, where a plethora of US CNC boutiques have tried and failed to survive, it is heartening to come across Tiso. Established in 1979 by Luciano Tiso as a CNC shop ‘servicing some of the biggest names in the Italian cycle industry’, Tiso is based in Caselserugo near Padua. In 2004 I suspect that its main business is manufacturing small parts like sealed bearing pulley wheels, but it resolutely kept manufacturing derailleurs for many, many, years.

I don’t have accurate dates, but I suspect that Tiso’s original model was the angular Venda 601 model that took its design cues from the US designs of the mid 1990s (see Paul and Precision Billet). I think this model may have appeared in the late 1990s.

In 2004 Tiso launched their Sereo 130 and Altore 366 models - which are virtually identical to each other but compatible with Campagnolo and Shimano systems respectively. These were much more curvaceous designs - demonstrating how the subtlety of CNC technology had progressed in a decade. This range was extended in 2005 to include a Triathlon specific Tri 300 model (which I suspect was a cynically rebadged Altore 366) and, sometime later, a new Venda 601 (an Altore 366 with a long cage) and mid-length cage versions of the Sereo 130 and Altore 366. The Tri 300 model disappeared fairly quickly - certainly by 2012 - but the others may still have been in production in 2013. They are not shown in the 2014 catalogue. These derailleurs were beautifully made, extremely light, weirdly named (what do those names and numbers mean?) and charmingly irrelevant.

At Eurobike in 2010 Tiso showed designs for a 11 or 12 speed wireless electronic derailleur system. Delivery was promised for 2011. The look at this time was edgy and futuristic.

By December 2012 a working prototype had appeared and it’s operation was featured in a rather strange promotional video on YouTube. The video promised a Tiso 12 speed cassette (although the system promised compatibility with 10 and 11 speed Campagnolo and Shimano cassettes) and what was referred to as ‘wireless or BlueTooth’ capability, which seems resolutely vague. The group included the cassette, front and rear derailleurs, levers and a central control box. By this time the rear derailleur had become a bloated, rounded, object - somewhat reminiscent of the over-fed look of the Airbus A380. I have never seen a production version of this system and, sadly, it seems to have disappeared without trace.

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