DISRAELI DOCUMENTS

Sachs-Huret

Sachs-Huret logo main image Sachs-Huret logo main image Sachs-Huret logo main image



Sachs-Huret Commander - instructions 1981?

Sachs-Huret Commander - instructions 1981?

Sachs-Huret Commander derailleur - instructions scan 1 thumbnail


Sachs-Huret - sticker 1983?

Sachs-Huret - sticker 1983?

Sachs-Huret - sticker thumbnail


see also French Registered Design # 845832-002 1984

see also French Registered Design # 845832-002 1984

French Registered Design 845832-002 - Huret Rider thumbnail


Founded in 1895 in Schweinfurt, Fichtel & Sachs (F&S) was one of the great European bicycle component companies. In 1980 F&S bought a controlling interest in Huret, and gradually changed the ‘Huret’ brand into ‘Sachs-Huret’. F&S also bought a number of other venerable but struggling French component companies in this period, including Sedis (chains) and Maillard (hubs, freewheels and possibly chainsets).

Then in 1987 Mannesmann, a giant German engineering conglomerate, bought the F&S group and restructured it. Mannesmann was very unimpressed by the quality of marketing in the European bicycle industry, and, for clarity, decided to change the brand back to plain ‘Sachs’, with the Huret name (and the F&S group’s other French brand names) disappearing from about 1991. Finally in 1997, Mannesmann sold the Sachs Bicycle Components unit of the old F&S to SRAM. SRAM dropped the ‘Sachs’ brand from 1999, but continued with some of Sach’s designs under the ‘SRAM’ brand name.

In terms of derailleurs, Sachs-Huret models consisted of three groups

  • Huret’s existing models cleaned up, slightly modernised and subjected to a welcome dose of German logic. In the last years of Huret their offer seemed to me to have been starved of thechnical development, styling and even much thought and F&S were able to bring more resources to the table.
  • Two immediate developments, the indexed Commander (to do battle with Shimano’s Positron system) and the drop parallelogram Rival (to do battle with Shimano’s 600 series). Both designs were slightly crude derivatives of Shimano designs, with two sprung pivots.
  • Once Sachs had got into its stride Sachs-Huret started to produce better constructed, better finished designs, although they remained essentially copies of Shimano designs.

There is some history of Sachs-Huret on the SRAM website.

Share this page