DISRAELI DOCUMENTS

Resilion

UK Patent 664,186 - Phillips main image UK Patent 818,266 - Resilion Crimson Star main image UK Patent 861,607 - Resilion Crimson Star main image


see also UK Patent # 664,186 1949

see also UK Patent # 664,186 1949

UK Patent 664,186 - Phillips thumbnail


see also Holdsworth - Aids to Happy Cycling 1949

see also Holdsworth - Aids to Happy Cycling 1949

Holdsworth - Aids to Happy Cycling 1949 front cover thumbnail


see also UK Patent # 750,110 1953

see also UK Patent # 750,110 1953

UK Patent 750,110 - Phillips thumbnail


see also Insist on a Phillips Derailleur Gear 1953

see also Insist on a Phillips Derailleur Gear 1953

Insist on a Phillips Derailleur Gear - scan 1 thumbnail


see also Phillips Range of Bicycles & Tricycles - 1953

see also Phillips Range of Bicycles & Tricycles - 1953

Phillips Range of Bicycles & Tricycles - 1953 scan 1 thumbnail


see also Phillips - catalogue 1954?

see also Phillips - catalogue 1954?

Phillips - catalogue 1954 scan 1 thumbnail


see also UK Patent # 818,266 1956

see also UK Patent # 818,266 1956

UK Patent 818,266 - Resilion Crimson Star thumbnail


see also UK Patent # 861,607 1957

see also UK Patent # 861,607 1957

UK Patent 861,607 - Resilion Crimson Star thumbnail


see also Phillips - catalogue 1957?

see also Phillips - catalogue 1957?

Phillips - catalogue 1957 scan 1 thumbnail


see also H. H. England - Cycling Manual 1960

see also H. H. England - Cycling Manual 1960

H H England - Cycling Manual page iii thumbnail

Resilion was founded in 1927 in London to produce a tough rubber saddle top made of a material called, you guessed it, ‘Resilion’. In 1929 it introduced its famous bolt-on cantilever brakes, arguably the most effective light weight brakes of the time and much loved by British tandem users well into the 1960s.

Despite introducing aluminium versions of their brake in 1948, Resilion were losing sales during the early 1950s as cheaper, simpler, lighter caliper brakes became more effective. In 1954 the company was acquired by Phillips Cycles and moved from London to Smethwick in Birmingham.

I think that Phillips wanted to develop Resilion as a specialist ‘lightweight’ component brand offering many different types of component. It certainly rebranded its existing ‘Phillips’ derailleurs as ‘Resilion’. The patent for the design of the Resilion Crimson Star derailleur lists Edward Arthur Millward as the inventor - just as for the 1949 Phillips derailleur patent.

I believe that the Resilion Crimson Star was produced into the 1960s, but after that Resilion, now part of the Raleigh operation, gave up manufacturing derailleurs.

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